MAD Mumblings MAD Mumblings
Extending MAD Magazine's presence on the World Wide Web.
 
Home :: Forum :: Gallery :: FAQ :: Search :: Memberlist :: Usergroups :: Register

ASK FRANK JACOBS !
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 21, 22, 23  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    MAD Mumblings Forum Index -> UGOI Features and Interviews
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
MinervaDoe
Forum Whore


Joined: 02 May 2006
Posts: 3026
Location: On the fence

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

01.gif Yeah. Here's my contribution to the (c)rap heap.

It's not Blake and it's not music.
I plug my ear so it won't bruise it.
They call them artists, but that's a stretch.
Something called art shouldn't make me retch.
I know it's all marketing to make a buck.
But the lack of imagination makes me go yuck.
Rhymes about robbery, violence and murder.
And they're done by thugs who should be flipping burgers.
Shaping the value of future generations.
Mass marketing crime like it's kennel Ration.
If I had my way, we'd shipwreck them on an island.
Preferably one with very little high land.
Now I've had my say and you know what I think.
I must be rappin' 'cuz my lyrics really stink. 07.gif

_________________
Groucho Marx wrote:
A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
opsman666
Alpha Clod


Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 1402
Location: Where the tumbleweeds don't roll

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

frank jacobs wrote:
My favorite oxymoron is "rap artist."


Ditto.

_________________
w00t!


Last edited by opsman666 on Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
frank jacobs
UGOI


Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 101
Location: burbank, ca

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uncle Dave LS wrote:
Welcome to the boards Frank! I'm curious-around 1987, what got you into writing non-musical TV and movie satires between 1987-91? It seems you replaced Lou Silverstone's genre with spoofs such as L.A. Lewd, Thirtysuffering, and St. Healthscare (all illustrated by Mort Drucker in September 1987, April 1989, and September 1988) among others, but I'm just curious about the 1987-93 period-it seemed like a changing time for MAD with Larry Siegel and Silverstone's retirements/respective move to Cracked, less Arnie Kogen articles (temporarily), and increased dominance of Dick DeBartolo and Stan Hart in the TV/movie satire department, and the 1990-93 art of Mort Drucker, Angelo Torres, and Sam Viviano seeming to be far lighter than other years. Kudos to Frank and the guys who concocted the interviews!

During the Glory Years, six freelancers wrote about 85% of the material. The six were Larry Siegel, Tom Koch, Stan Hart, Arnie Kogen, Dick DeBartolo, and myself.
I wrote most of my TV spoofs when Siegel, Hart, and Kogen were busy in tv. Lou Silverstone was an important contributor but not a major one. His "Big Tush" is a classic. As for your comments about the art, I never saw a fall-off in quality.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Flight From Ashiya
1960s Throwback


Joined: 17 Jun 2003
Posts: 3522
Location: Forbidden Planet

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

frank jacobs wrote:
Flight From Ashiya wrote:
Hi Frank 01.gif. Welcome to Mad Mumblings Dot Com.

My question is:



Did you worry about the 'Nixon Administration' from 1969 onwards because is seems to me that you took a political stand in the 1970s?.Were you also responsible for some of the subliminal ridicule of the 'Johnson Administration' from the mid sixties?.


Thanks Frank for taking a stand on moral issues in parody & satire!.




Over the years, MAD got tougher with Presidents. JFK got off easy. LBJ was hit a bit harder, especially regarding Vietnam. Nixon became a wonderful target. He was spoofed without mercy. Jimmy Carter was almost too dull to spoof. I wrote a piece titled "Commemorative Stamps We'd Like to See." One stamp featured a likeness of Carter with the inscription, "Mediocre President." I received a letter from an outraged reader for that one.
Nixon was the first President who got the full treatment. He was such an easy target. Reagan got off easier. In recent years, Clinton and Dubya have been hit the hardest, even more than Nixon was.
One piece of info about MAD: Regardless of the political views of the staff, both the Democrats and GOP receive equal treatment.




08.gif Ha.ha. poor ol' Jimmy Carter!.Thanks Frank.
I can't go through my old 'Mads' because the dust'll kill me but I remember reading many of your jibes at President Nixon & pollution & poverty in America in the early 1970s.Anything that was slightly more bold & audatious had 'Frank Jacobs' in the credits.
I thought you were giving 'Mad' a bit more freedom to criticise rather than lampoon.My point being that it was probably more dangerous to make fun of Johnson (who had no sense of humour)& Nixon than any other later Presidents.Mad/Gaines had already had a run-in with Hoover's F.B.I.With Vietnam & the Cold War it wasn't a time to 'speak out' without several chain locks on your front door!.



_________________
"To boldly go, where no MAD has gone before".
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
canucklehead
UberHoser


Joined: 23 May 2004
Posts: 2220
Location: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Frank, for your detailed and thoughtful answer to my question. As a songwriter and a lover of lyricists in general, I have always enjoyed your approach to the music "of the day" and it's a bit wistful for me to think that the "MAD musical" ship has sailed, likely never to return again. It speaks more of a change in our overall cultural experience here in North America, going far beyond the comparitively-slender topics of MAD satire, commercial radio or popular music.

Before I ask my next question, I just have to comment on a few of the topics you brought up...

frank jacobs wrote:
Gradually, as rock took over, the number of great songs dramatically decreased. A few craftsmen emerged – Simon and Garfunkel, Bob Dylan, etc., so, as in “Keep on Trekkin’” and “The Ring and I,” I parodied such songs as “The Windmills of Your Mind,” “The Sound of Silence,” and “Blowing in the Wind.” Three Barbra Streisand films were big hits, allowing me to write my favorite (and best, I think) MAD musical, “On a Clear Day You Can See a Funny Girl Singing ‘Hello, Dolly’ Forever.”


Oh! I can't believe I forgot "Keep On Trekkin'" when I was writing my original question (I was writing it in a hurry, I must confess). Even as a non-Trekkie, I loved that one because it "boldly went where no MAD has gone before" in terms of weaving relevant musical parodies into the traditional Star Trek characters and scenarios. It remains one of my all-time MAD favourites to this day.

frank jacobs wrote:
I recall writing a set of Billy Joel parodies, discovering that his songs, though immensely popular, lacked the craft in lyrics of, say, Lerner, Hammerstein, and Lorenz Hart. But this was a period when Joel, the Beatles and others were almost exclusively performing their own material. This was a new wrinkle. For example, I’m not aware of “Piano Man” being recorded by someone else.


As a longtime fan of the former Mr. Christie Brinkley, I fondly recall "MAD's Billy Joel Songbook" from #327, even though I thought the piece lacked the punch of your "Bruce Springsteen Songbook" from #271 (especially the Bill Cosby-themed "I'm For Hire" and the Ted Turner slam "Color Them"). Maybe that's because you didn't have any great passion for the subject of the parodies (if the previous comment is any indication). I was surprised to see you end the piece with "Censorland," a spoof of BJ's "No Man's Land" which was the first single from his fair-to-middling River Of Dreams album in 1993. Considering that the original was likely the least well-known of the songs you chose to parody, it was quite a surprise to have "Censorland" emerge as my personal favourite piece from that article.

frank jacobs wrote:
When I turned “Born in the USA’” into “Porn in the USA,” I realized that Bruce Springsteen’s numbers were sadly lacking in polish, relying instead on his booming, electrifying performance. This had become the norm.
Rock had taken over, then rap and hip-hop, and most people under 40 knew nothing better. My opinion about rap and hip-hop is unfit for print.


There's that Springsteen guy again! Interesting to note that Paul Coker was chosen to illustrate both of those pieces ("Porn In The U.S.A." from #256 and "The Bruce Springsteen Songbook" from #271).

Your comments about rap and hip-hop (in this post and others) are intruiging, in that you attempted to capture the genre in a number of '80s and '90s articles, some more successful than others. (Personal favourites: "Rap MAD" cover from #278, "MAD Raps Up Shakespeare" from #300, "MAD Raps Up The Bible" from #310 and "When Country-Western Goes Rap" from #317; not so high on "When Rap Music Spreads Into Everyday Life" from #289, however.)

I also recall your Salt & Pepa via Hillary Clinton spoof "What A Plan" from the excellent "Bill Clinton MTV Songbook" (#331) - you must have felt like gouging out your eyes and eardrums as you attempted to make sense of that one.

My heavens, I'm enjoying this. Thanks for bringing back a lot of great MAD memories as you respond to our questions, Frank!

Speaking of questions...

You have always shown a delightful knack for many styles of lyrical parodies. Have you ever published any of your own original works? Do you write poetry or song lyrics outside of the satirical/MAD vein?

_________________
"In things pertaining to enthusiasm, no man is sane who does not know how to be insane on proper occasions."
- U.S. Clergyman Henry Ward Beecher
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger
frank jacobs
UGOI


Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 101
Location: burbank, ca

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2006 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The bulk of my verse and parodies have been written for MAD -- in the magazine and in some of my MAD paperbacks, especially "MAD for Better or Verse." I've done some rhyming for Punch (the now-defunct British humor magazine) and other publications. You can find a collection of my verse in "Pitiless Parodies" (Dover), also in "Fun with Hand Shadows" (Dover), in which I collaborated with an artist who died more than 100 years ago.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
canucklehead
UberHoser


Joined: 23 May 2004
Posts: 2220
Location: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Frank! I'll have to try and dig those up (maybe I can enlist my old friend Col. Nigel Fabbersham to help me)...

Another question, if you don't mind:

We've already touched on music/poetry and politics - were there any other genres of MAD work that you particularly enjoyed?

I ask this because I've seen your byline on quite a few comic-strip parodies (beginning with "The MAD Comic Opera" way back in the '50s and including one of my all-time MAD favourites, "MAD's Anatomy Of The Human Body Based On The Comics" from 1982), as well as at least two notable Sesame Street spoofs ("If Sesame Street Branched Out Into Specialized Fields Of Education" from '79, and the stinging "When Sesame Street Caves In To The Radical Right" from '95). Sports themes have frequently arisen in your work as well.

Any other recurring favourites, over the years? And any thoughts on the ones I've just mentioned?

_________________
"In things pertaining to enthusiasm, no man is sane who does not know how to be insane on proper occasions."
- U.S. Clergyman Henry Ward Beecher
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger
melvin_m_melvin
British UGOI


Joined: 07 Oct 2004
Posts: 1266
Location: Peterborough, England, UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

frank jacobs wrote:
My… best, I think, MAD musical, “On a Clear Day You Can See a Funny Girl Singing ‘Hello, Dolly’ Forever.


I love your work Frank, and I’m delighted to see you posting on a forum that’s attainable to ordinary readers. With massive respect, I think most long-term Maddoes would cite ‘East Side Story’ as the best musical spoof – for me, this is possibly even the best ARTICLE ever, in MAD.

frank jacobs wrote:
Billy Joel… Bruce Springsteen… lacking in polish


Though I’ve tried to move with the times (b 1948!) and still buy albums from Kasabian, Razorlight, Kings of Leon, etc., I can see both sides of the debate. I think Springsteen was overrated at the outset, and find most of his stuff avoidable, but love one or two (‘Secret Garden’, especially, and ‘Tougher Than the Rest’.) I think Joel is totally overrated, and find all of his stuff avoidable.

frank jacobs wrote:
< The era of the MAD musical had come and gone. >


There have been a few omissions, too, I feel (again, nobody’s fault at MAD). I don’t recall ‘Oliver’ ever having been “done” by MAD – I’d have loved to see Mort’s “take” on that one – nor any of Lloyd Webber’s work.

By the way, I seethe at the way classic musicals like South Pacific and Oklahama are misunderstood by current generations. Recent ‘Top 40 All-Time’ –type lists on UK TV leave such masterpieces rattling around in the thirties, at the expense of “winning” atrocities like ‘Grease’ and the awful ‘Rocky Horror Show’.

Around the 1960s, some musicals – rather than containing a raft of strong numbers, as the Rodgers/Hammerstein/Hart/Lerner/Loewe classics had – seemed to contain one key number, on which they based all the publicity, plus a load of what I call “filler” songs. In addition, Leslie Bricusse stated that his formula was to take a phrase and make a whole song out of it – aargh!

Furthermore, there are now musicals that are “not real musicals”, being compilations of existing songs (Return to the Forbidden Planet; We Will Rock You, etc.); Disney cartoons adapted for the stage (albeit well); and so on.

Thanks, again, Frank, for enlivening these threads.

Dave
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
frank jacobs
UGOI


Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 101
Location: burbank, ca

PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave, I agree with everything you wrote. As for "Oliver," I suppose it could have become a MAD musical, but looking back I can't imagine what the "hook" could have been.

Last edited by frank jacobs on Thu Dec 07, 2006 1:30 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
melvin_m_melvin
British UGOI


Joined: 07 Oct 2004
Posts: 1266
Location: Peterborough, England, UK

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agreed, Frank

Thanks again

David
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
frank jacobs
UGOI


Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 101
Location: burbank, ca

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave, I neglected to respond to your comments about "East Side Story." When I proposed the idea, Nick Meglin came up with the brilliant idea of using photographs of the U.N. as the background for Mort Drucker's art. The result was, well, WOW!
A sad postscript: The pages were purchased at one of the MAD auctions, and some misguided soul CUT UP the piece and sold individual panels. It was enough to make one weep.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MinervaDoe
Forum Whore


Joined: 02 May 2006
Posts: 3026
Location: On the fence

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any suggestions on how to find a publicist who will give the author a favorable deal?
_________________
Groucho Marx wrote:
A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
frank jacobs
UGOI


Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 101
Location: burbank, ca

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you be more specific?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MAD Store.Com
Alpha Clod


Joined: 15 Jun 2003
Posts: 1025
Location: The Mad Store.Com

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank,

Today is December 7th, the anniversary of "The Day That Will Live In Infamy."

What were you doing when you first heard about the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor (not that you actually could have been alive on that day--you don't look a day over 39 to me!)?

If you want to "Jaffee" this question, be my guest. It certainly isn't the brightest one on this thread by a long shot.

_________________
http://www.themadstore.com

The Mad Store.Com
Your Online Humor Source !
E-Mail: TheMADStore@aol.com

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
frank jacobs
UGOI


Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 101
Location: burbank, ca

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was I at Hickam Field? No. Was I interviewing Tojo in Tokyo? No. Actually, I was sitting at home at a table doing a jigsaw puzzle.

Last edited by frank jacobs on Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:34 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    MAD Mumblings Forum Index -> UGOI Features and Interviews All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 21, 22, 23  Next
Page 2 of 23

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum



Admin Contact: Webcrawler | phpBB 2.0.11
All forum comments are owned by whoever posted them. All images hotlinked or uploaded to this site are property of their respective owners.